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, is a frequent guest on "morning joe" to discuss foreign policies and world affairs. but this spring she came to us with her own memoir. "prague winter: a personal story of remembrance and war from 1937 to 1948." in it, she tells of prague in one of its darkest chapters, the breakout of world war ii, when at just 2 years old, she was forced to flee czechoslovakia with her family. hearse is an immigrant story like so many others, including my mother's and fathers. whose birthday, my father's, will never forget. you've got a really good memory. she's the author of the new memoir of "prague winter: a personal story of remembrance and war from 1937 to 1948." this book is amazing. >> and speaking of the brzezinskis, you know, it's amazing how much dr. brzezinski's life was shaped by the fact that they fled warsaw right before the uprising and mrs. brzezinski, of course, had to flee czechoslovakia, just like you. and you actually talked about in a debate that rose up about colin powell and his view of the world, polilus -- versus your v of the world, how your view was shaped by your childhood. >> t
to get into foreign policy. one of the first things he does is he reaches out to one of the senator fulbrights. he gets a call from senator byrd's office. they ask him to come in interview. he is stunned. he does not think senator byrd cares about foreign policy. senator byrd convinces him he wants to be involved in foreign policy. as the book unfolds and as i learned about it, it is amazing to see how strong he is on foreign policy almost from the beginning. he plays this phenomenally important role. in the panama canal treaties. it is not just who has the votes, but he understands the substance better than anyone else. they all went down to panama, but he leads one of the first trips. he goes down there and he learns the panama issues. he brought the same dedication to every issue. one thing i say in the book is he knew that just being leader did not make you a great senator automatically. whoever heard of scott lucas and william nolan, senate majority leaders before lyndon johnson. you never heard of them because they did not do anything. robert byrd brought that extra dimension
god bless you and god bless america. [applause] >> tomorrow morning a look at foreign policy in 2012. then the biggest political stories of 2012 with fox news political analyst juan williams. washington juren live every day at 7:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> the senate runches for legislative business on thursday and the house has a proform asession scheduled that day. the first would extend provisions of the fisa act. the other is a pack abbling for areas affected by hurricane sandy. you can follow live coverage of the senate on c-span2. and house members are on stand by as negotiations continue over the so-called fiscal cliff. >> now a conversation on hollywood's portrayal of politics and policy making in movies and tv shows. among those we'll hear from the crete or the of the show "homeland." this is an hour 20 minutes. >> good evening again. welcome back to the forum. i'm not the one you'll be applauding for. you know we have public events, public forums in our headquarters campus about once a month. and we've had former presidents and foreign ministers and ambassadors an
to ask him, not just about israel, but to me the most significant foreign policy challenge for president obama in our country and the world in the next year or two is iran and the nuclear weapons program. chuck hagel has had some outlying votes on that. >> i don't think he will get many republican votes. i like chuck, but his positions i didn't frankly know all of them, are really out of the mainstream and well to the left of the president. >> so on iran, hagel cast some votes not supporting iranian sanctions. on israel, these marks that he's made in the past, coming back to haunt him now. we'll have on-to-see in coming days if it becomes the fact that hagel is white house nominee. >> such an odd situation. the whole idea of nominating hagel it would be a bipartisan choice. he is a republican. former republican senator, who would be in a democratic administration. republicans are out against him. have you heard of any support for him in this process? >> well, you know there, are people who are coming out and supporting him. public letters from former, very prominent generals, admirals, a
to a rock star. but china's foreign policies are likely to stay the same. number five, moment morsi, islamist group, became president of egypt. as his predecessor, dictator ousted by his people, went on trial from his hospital bed. morsi impressed the west by helping to broker the cease fire that ended an outbreak of warfare between hamas and israel. he then disappointed many by aawarding himself sweeping power s at home, triggering new outbursts in tahrir square. number four, israel and hamas brought fuel on the fiery west in the region. one side firing rockets. for the first time, israel felt vulnerable in jerusalem and tell aaveev. before the big guns of diplomacy helped to broker a cease fire. number three in europe, greece was the problem child that spent too much, saved nothing and threatened to take down the euro. new leadership, pay cuts, higher taxes as their weary government begs for more cash. committing to save the euro. it lives on, but for how long? >> the deadliest month to date as the assad regime intensified its air power. >> how much longer can this man hold on to
at the biggest foreign policy events of the year. >> i was handing out leaflets for robert kennedy. i broke with the democratic party and went to work for john lindsay. i went down to the liberal party. i was handing out leaflets on a street corner in new york. and a woman thought it was acucute. she asked me why and i made an early case for lindsey and i made the case against his opponent. she handed me a box of pastry. i took a back to headquarters. there were all these doughnuts and a lot of $10 bills. one of my early lessons in politics and i was told you can keep the money. >> david axelrod on his life in journalism and politics. fall by the all women delegation of new hampshire. then growing up in the white house. tonight on c-span. >> there was a forum on women in leadership. hilda solis spoke about her career and serving in the obama administration. >> good morning. they come from los angeles and cleveland and baltimore. poor and white. each of them have one thing in common. they are all successful. each rose to the top of their field in the arts or politics or sports. we will talk
to breathe. i'm joined by a washington-based journalist who specializes in foreign policy. she attended a university in new delhi and has personally experienced what i understand is groping on public transportation. tell us, first of all, what is the -- what is going on? what is happening there that you've got even over the last, you know, years or so more than a tenfold increase in the past 40 years in india of this kind of violence against women. >> it's always been the case. it's not new as such. to be a woman in india is not an easy proposition. every woman has experienced some kind of abuse on public transportation, lewd remarks on the streets if you're walking down. no matter how conservatively you're dressed, you're still, you know, open season for the men. there is just a lot of reasons why this happens. patriarchal system is one, a lack of policing is another, and general treatment of women, which is not equal to men, even though it may be so under the law. >> you say you personally have experienced this as well. can you tell us about that. >> yes. i was a student at new delhi
with the united states government and that is, i'll support you are foreign policy initiatives in the region by and large if you stay out of my internal affairs. i think that's where he is right now. it appears like the united states government is doing just that. heather: take this beyond the borders of egypt to the area of the middle east, what does this mean for the rest of the ream on? >> well, it is pretty significant. egypt is the a very influential country. even though it is one of the poorest countries in the region, it is a powerful arab country. it has a powerful military for sure and has significant intellectual and cultural influence on the region. so what goes on in egypt truly matters. listen, the contours of this revolutionary change taking place in the middle east, certainly the catalyst for it was democratic and social reform and economic opportunity but the radicals, the muslim brotherhood, are easy seeing the opportunity to advantage themselves geopolitically in the region. that is the danger here. that this continues to move in that direction in other parts of the region.
to protect, which is a foreign policy concept that if there are people in harm's way that the united states government has a responsibility to protect. jaime: he drew a red line. on top of that he drew the red line, president obama did and said that chemical weapons were the point at which we wouldn't sit back any more. >> right. jaime: so what can we do? >> that was the new red line. that was the new red line. jaime: yes, and what are we equipped to do if we did respond? >> well certainly waiting 21 months of doing practically nothing has made the situation worse. so we are in a deeper problem now. if we would have acted 21 months ago to support the opposition -- look, i think that it's actually more humane to give the opposition enough arms to stop this. if we would have done this months ago we would have been able to have the end of this after six or seven months. but now since we've ignored it 21 months of violence, i don't think is a very moral position to be in. i think if we would have armed the opposition earlier it would have ended earlier, and that's i think a more compelling mora
evaluating the investment landscape in india. obviously we've seen a lot of foreign investors allocate capital into this market. we are looking at the rupee depreciating significantly over the last year. the company dealing with other problems including lack of infrastructure, some policy changes. what is your recent -- i guess your updated outlook on india going forward? >> well, the local market has justice done phenomenally in 2012. up 25%. but it didn't help u.s. dollar investors because the currency fell the same amount. so really everyone kind of broke even even though the market took off this year. i think india is still a market where you want to keep building positions gradually over time. there's been a lot of issues around the government. i think the instakt around the government and people's predicting how long it will take to push back reforms has impacted the market quite a bit. i think one thing under the surface in india and china that all investors need to be aware of is the fact that corporate debt is now really building up to almost unhealthy levels. and i would keep
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10